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The challenge faced by 21st century policymakers is to provide outdoor light where and when it is needed while reducing costs, improving visibility, and minimizing any adverse effects on plants, animals, and humans caused through exposure to unnatural levels of light at night. (Kyba et al., 2014 Kyba, C., Hänel, A., & Hölker, F. (2014). Redefining efficiency for outdoor lighting. Energy & Environmental Science, 7, 1806–1809.10.1039/C4EE00566J[Crossref], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar], p. 1807) When you report a faulty street light we will inspect it as soon as possible. We normally repair them within 5 working days but where lights are not working because of supply cable faults this could take longer. When artificial light affects organisms and ecosystems it is called ecological light pollution. While light at night can be beneficial, neutral, or damaging for individual species, its presence invariably disturbs ecosystems. For example, some species of spiders avoid lit areas, while other species are happy to build their spider web directly on a lamp post. Since lamp posts attract many flying insects, the spiders that don’t mind light, gain an advantage over the spiders that avoid it. This is a simple example of the way in which species frequencies and food webs can be disturbed by the introduction of light at night. Light pollution is a side-effect of industrial civilization. Its sources include building exterior and interior lighting, advertising, outdoor area lighting (e.g. car parks/parking lots), offices, factories, streetlights, and illuminated sporting venues. It is most severe in highly industrialized, densely populated areas of North America, Europe, and Japan and in major cities in the Middle East and North Africa like Tehran and Cairo, but even relatively small amounts of light can be noticed and create problems. Awareness of the deleterious effects of light pollution began early in the 20th Century (see e.g. Beston[8]), but efforts to address effects did not begin until the 1950s.[9] In the 1980s a global dark-sky movement emerged with the founding of the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA). There are now such educational and advocacy organizations in many countries worldwide. Admittedly, I have left much unsaid. Since my modest proposal appeals to a miracle, there may be no physical predictions and hence nothing that we can test. Still, even a miracle can leave some observable evidence. For instance, Jesus’ disciples and many others saw (and even touched) our Lord’s risen body. Many people saw other bodies healed or raised from the dead. Thousands of people ate miraculously produced fish and bread, and many tasted the wine at the marriage feast of Cana. Might my proposal yield effects that we might observe today? Perhaps. Consider light leaving a distant star shortly after its formation on Day Four. In my view the intervening space was stretched to bring the light rapidly to earth. Soon after this event, probably still on Day Four, space assumed the properties that it appears to have today. Were properties of the light, such as wavelength and frequency, altered during this process? I would suppose not. If it did, then it likely would produce an observable change of some sort. We will not fit a shade to new LED street lighting for the first 3 months after installation. If there is still an issue after 3 months, please report the problem. If an outdoor lighting pole is broken, please call Xcel Energy Customer Care at 1-800-895-4999. (Except in Minnesota; continue form submission) Unless your car starts smoking or stalls completely head over to an auto parts store and have them run a diagnostic to find the cause of the check engine light. Call ahead and make sure they can handle your make and model, since some cars have special computers. Once you’re at the store, they’ll come out and plug a small computer underneath your dashboard and read back a code stating what happened to the car. Research is also examining the effects on flora and fauna, especially birds, bats, turtles, and insects. While a few species benefit from increased brightness at night, many are negatively affected. Perhaps most notable are the effects of artificial light on migrating birds and newly hatched turtles attempting to reach the ocean (Gallaway, 2010 Gallaway, T. (2010). On light pollution, passive pleasures, and the instrumental value of beauty. Journal of Economic Issues, 44, 71–88.10.2753/JEI0021-3624440104[Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar]; Pottharst & Könecke, 2013 Pottharst, M., & Könecke, B. (2013). The night and its Loss. In Space-time design of the public city, urban and landscape perspectives (Vol. 15, pp. 37–48). Dordrecht: Springer.10.1007/978-94-007-6425-5[Crossref] [Google Scholar]). The effects of artificial lighting on human health first emerged in the late 1960s, but have gained more attention by medical researchers in the last few decades. Pottharst and Könecke (2013 Pottharst, M., & Könecke, B. (2013). The night and its Loss. In Space-time design of the public city, urban and landscape perspectives (Vol. 15, pp. 37–48). Dordrecht: Springer.10.1007/978-94-007-6425-5[Crossref] [Google Scholar]) summarize ongoing research correlating nighttime lighting—and more specifically disruptions to our circadian rhythm—to insomnia, depression, obesity, loss of night-vision, and the suppression of melatonin (which is potentially linked to an increased risk of breast cancer). While the precise connection between human well-being and exposure to artificial nighttime lighting requires further research, the World Health Organization has nevertheless stated that exposure to certain lights at night is likely a carcinogen (Morgan-Taylor, 2014 Morgan-Taylor, M. (2014). Regulating light pollution in Europe: Legal challenges and ways forward. In J. Meier, U. Hasenöhrl, K. Krause, & M. Pottharst (Eds.), Urban lighting, light pollution and society (pp. 159–176). New York, NY: Taylor & Francis. [Google Scholar]). Concerns have also remained regarding the inverse of proliferating nighttime lighting, namely the rapidly declining access to a natural night sky in the developed world. In recent decades attempts to quantify skyglow and its global presence have emerged, however, data is still somewhat sparse. The first attempt to map this phenomenon on a global scale was published by Cinzano et al. (2001 Cinzano, P., Falchi, F., & Elvidge, C. D. (2001). The first world Atlas of the artificial night sky brightness. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 328, 689–707.10.1046/j.1365-8711.2001.04882.x[Crossref], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar]). A more recent study by Gallaway et al. (2010 Gallaway, T., Olsen, R., & Mitchell, D. (2010). The economics of global light pollution. Ecological Economics, 69, 658–665.10.1016/j.ecolecon.2009.10.003[Crossref], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar]) built on their findings and concluded that the amount of people living in areas with a ‘polluted night sky’ is extremely high: around 99% in both North America and the European Union.88. Gallaway et al. (2010 Gallaway, T., Olsen, R., & Mitchell, D. (2010). The economics of global light pollution. Ecological Economics, 69, 658–665.10.1016/j.ecolecon.2009.10.003[Crossref], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar]) utilize the threshold criteria established by Cinzano et al. (2001 Cinzano, P., Falchi, F., & Elvidge, C. D. (2001). The first world Atlas of the artificial night sky brightness. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 328, 689–707.10.1046/j.1365-8711.2001.04882.x[Crossref], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar]) for considering an area ‘polluted’ by light. These criteria ‘consider the night sky polluted when the artificial brightness of the sky is greater than 10% of the natural sky brightness above 45° of elevation’ (Gallaway et al., 2010 Gallaway, T., Olsen, R., & Mitchell, D. (2010). The economics of global light pollution. Ecological Economics, 69, 658–665.10.1016/j.ecolecon.2009.10.003[Crossref], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar], p. 660).View all notes Furthermore, on both continents approximately 70% of the population lives in areas where brightness at night is at least three times natural levels. From a dark rural area, our unaided eyes can normally see up to 3,000 stars; people with strong eyesight can even see close to 7,000 stars. However, in many urban areas today this number is reduced to around 50, or perhaps even less (Mizon, 2012 Mizon, B. (2012). Light pollution: Responses and remedies (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Springer.10.1007/978-1-4614-3822-9[Crossref] [Google Scholar]). Researchers caution that if the current pace of increasing brightness continues, the ‘pristine night sky’ could become ‘extinct’ in the continental United States by 2025 (Fischer, 2011 Fischer, A. (2011). Starry night. Places Journal. Retrieved 22 October, 2014,. from https://placesjournal.org/article/starry-night/[Crossref] [Google Scholar]). erogan machoman erogan Tonus Fortis Zevs Erozon Max el macho el macho Masculin Active el macho

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