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The below discussion is organized under two broad questions, with the aim of elucidating the moral limitations and practical ambiguities existing within the concept of light pollution, when considered as a framework for moral and political decision-making. These two sections should not be seen as mutually exclusive, but as actively informing one another. That light can cause pollution is a new idea for most people, and many may think it is not really very important except to astronomers. But light pollution interferes with living systems in many ways, causing, for example, sea turtles to lose their way to the sea, migrating birds to become confused and strike buildings, and plant seasonal cycles to be disturbed. It also affects human hormone cycles and our day-and-night cycles of sleep and wakefulness. Using light carelessly wastes energy, resources used to make the energy, and interferes with everyone’s visibility not only of stars but also of things on the ground that we need to see. Several different types of light sources exist, each having different properties that affect their appropriateness for certain tasks, particularly efficiency and spectral power distribution. It is often the case that inappropriate light sources have been selected for a task, either due to ignorance or because more sophisticated light sources were unavailable at the time of installation. Therefore, badly chosen light sources often contribute unnecessarily to light pollution and energy waste. By re-assessing and changing the light sources used, it is often possible to reduce energy use and pollutive effects while simultaneously greatly improving efficiency and visibility. Here I have presented the beginning of a new proposal of a solution to the light travel time problem. I anticipate that this appeal to a miraculous solution likely will be the greatest criticism of this proposal. As creationists, we ought not to be so resistant to believing in miracles. We might as well enquire as to the physical aspects of the virgin birth or resurrection of Jesus. Both of these events are objective reality, but both were miraculous. Creation by its very nature was a miraculous event/process. As scientists, we are so used to looking at physical mechanisms that we often want to box in the Creation Week in terms of physical/natural processes. While certain aspects of the Creation Week probably were physical and there likely are physical ramifications of creation even today, we ought to realize that there are certain things about the Creation Week that we as scientists cannot fully comprehend. I admit that I had spent more than 30 years thinking primarily in terms of a physical explanation for the light travel time problem, when the solution may be far simpler and more direct. ¹ http://physics.fau.edu/observatory/lightpol-health.html ² http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/08/15/nutrients-better-sleep.aspx ³ https://www.sciencenews.org/article/darkness-melatonin-may-stall-breast-and-prostate-cancers ⁴ http://physics.fau.edu/observatory/lightpol-environ.html Inspection of the area surrounding Madrid reveals that the effects of light pollution caused by a single large conglomeration can be felt up to 100 km (62 mi) away from the center.[28] Global effects of light pollution are also made obvious. The entire area consisting of southern England, Netherlands, Belgium, west Germany, and northern France have a sky brightness of at least 2 to 4 times above normal (see above right). The only places in continental Europe where the sky can attain its natural darkness are in northern Scandinavia and in islands far from the continent. If there is a problem with the electricity supply, we will need to inform the electricity supplier and could take more time to fix the light. 6. These four categories of light pollution are used (although with slightly different terms) by the International Dark-Sky Association, and cited elsewhere as well (e.g. Morgan-Taylor, 2014 Morgan-Taylor, M. (2014). Regulating light pollution in Europe: Legal challenges and ways forward. In J. Meier, U. Hasenöhrl, K. Krause, & M. Pottharst (Eds.), Urban lighting, light pollution and society (pp. 159–176). New York, NY: Taylor & Francis. [Google Scholar]). As such, I am accepting these as the standard causes of light pollution. This comes with a rather unique set of challenges, because what is polluting for one person can be acceptable or even desirable lighting for another. There are uses of light that are necessary at night, especially in cities; no ‘dark sky advocate’ would deny that. And there are obvious instances of excessive brightness and poorly designed lighting, which most reasonable people would agree is unnecessary and wasteful. But, there will also be instances that fall somewhere in an intermediary, gray area. These could be instances where the lighting does not obviously fall into one of the sub-categories of light pollution, or does not relate directly to one of the identified effects of light pollution, or is contested as a good by some stakeholders and a nuisance or excess by others. Or, it could be a new technological innovation that reduces energy consumption but will potentially increase skyglow—an emerging issue connected to LEDs (Morgan-Taylor, 2014 Morgan-Taylor, M. (2014). Regulating light pollution in Europe: Legal challenges and ways forward. In J. Meier, U. Hasenöhrl, K. Krause, & M. Pottharst (Eds.), Urban lighting, light pollution and society (pp. 159–176). New York, NY: Taylor & Francis. [Google Scholar]). In these instances, we will see the weighing of benefits versus negative effects by regulatory decision-makers. It is unclear how the current conception of light pollution can be used to resolve such conflicts, without drawing upon a larger moral framework—for example, a formulation of the precautionary principle, a definition of sustainable development, or perhaps an explicit focus on minimizing energy usage—that helps to elucidate exactly what an acceptable level of pollution is. And, different approaches may rely on rights-based or consequentialist moral frameworks. These may, in turn, offer different boundary conditions for what qualifies as acceptable levels of light pollution. For example, in 2007, a group of astronomers published the Starlight Declaration, asserting that access to the night sky should be an ‘inalienable right of humankind’ (Starlight Initiative, 2007 Starlight Initiative. (2007). Declaration in defence of the night sky and the right to starlight. La Palma: La Palma Biosphere Reserve. Retrieved 14 January, 2015, from https://www.starlight2007.net/ [Google Scholar], p. 3). Adopting such a rights-based approach would likely yield different conclusions than, say, a cost-benefit analysis. We would then need to ask if light pollution is, or should be, beholden to one broader moral framework, or how different manifestations can be reconciled. If we recall the discussion of defining problems within policy as a means to guide action (Stone, 2002 Stone, D. (2002). Policy paradox: The art of political decision making. New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company Inc. [Google Scholar]), the concept of light pollution therefore requires further parameters beyond the causes and effects listed above. The problem with the last bulb is this; the dimmer switch itself needs to see a suitable load. i.e. it is happy working into a standard filament bulb. It’s driving all your lights in parallel, so whilst there is one regular bulb in there the dimmer is still happy. At the point you replace that last bulb with an LED lamp, the dimmer now sees only LED electronics as its load. The dimmer will not function properly (due to the way it works, it won’t fire correct) and the result is it sends occasional pulses to the lights in its confusion and you observe the flickering. My instax camera fell about less than 1m height, and now the red light next to the viewing lens is not disappearing. Due to that, i cannot take photos when i press the button. Help? Because of the increased sensitivity of the human eye to blue and green wavelengths when viewing low-luminances (the Purkinje effect) in the night sky, different sources produce dramatically different amounts of visible skyglow from the same amount of light sent into the atmosphere. Hey. My camera also fell like a week ago and the red light near the lense won’t go and if I take a photo, the film won’t come out like if I didn’t had any. Anabolic Rx24 VigRX Plus BeMass eracto Celuraid Muscle xtrasize BeMass erogan Tonus Fortis Testogen

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