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We are faced with a new problem: simply put, we have too much light at night. For centuries, more and better urban nighttime lighting was largely seen as desirable and necessary. However, following the rapid proliferation of electric lighting throughout the twentieth century, the impacts of artificial nighttime illumination have become a research interest—or rather concern—in a variety of disciplines. Nighttime lighting uses enormous amounts of energy, in addition to costing billions of dollars, damaging ecosystems, and negatively affecting human health.11. These effects are described in more detail in Section 3.3.View all notes With this emerging knowledge, continuing with the same use patterns and regulatory strategies can no longer be justified. We must rethink our urban nights. But, some amount of artificial light is, of course, still desirable and necessary at night. Therefore, our new problem comes with a novel question: how much artificial light at night is appropriate? Steve Mazor, the Auto Club of Southern California’s chief automotive engineer, says that while some people freak out when they see the Check Engine light, “others just put a piece of black tape over it and keep driving.” Mazor says it’s important to promptly address problems indicated by the light. Ignoring them could lead to larger, more costly problems later. You can report problems with street lights or illuminated signs on council-maintained roads and footpaths (public highway) to the council. You can report a fault online or by telephone. Here I have presented the beginning of a new proposal of a solution to the light travel time problem. I anticipate that this appeal to a miraculous solution likely will be the greatest criticism of this proposal. As creationists, we ought not to be so resistant to believing in miracles. We might as well enquire as to the physical aspects of the virgin birth or resurrection of Jesus. Both of these events are objective reality, but both were miraculous. Creation by its very nature was a miraculous event/process. As scientists, we are so used to looking at physical mechanisms that we often want to box in the Creation Week in terms of physical/natural processes. While certain aspects of the Creation Week probably were physical and there likely are physical ramifications of creation even today, we ought to realize that there are certain things about the Creation Week that we as scientists cannot fully comprehend. I admit that I had spent more than 30 years thinking primarily in terms of a physical explanation for the light travel time problem, when the solution may be far simpler and more direct. ​Please help us by giving detailed information about the problem. For example, tell us if the light is out altogether, going on and off, burning all day or intermittent and include the number of the column if you can. If you can’t see this then please state the exact location or adjacent house number. Could this abnormally fast growth and development of plants on Day Three be anything like the pattern of making the astronomical bodies on Day Four? In my previous work on Day Four creation (Faulkner 1999), I had suggested such a rapid process, albeit without drawing the parallel to the creation of plants. The Day Three parallel can be very useful in solving the light travel time problem. The reason that plants made on Day Three could not develop at the rate that they normally do today is that they could not have performed their function of providing food on Days Five and Six. The quickest developing fruit require weeks or months, and trees require years to do this. In a similar manner, the stars could not fulfill their functions of marking seasons and days and years (v. 14) unless they were visible by Day Six. I propose that the light had to abnormally “grow” or “shoot” its way to the earth to fulfill this function. Notice that this is not the result of some natural process any more than the shooting up of plants on Day Three was. Instead, this is a miraculous, abnormally fast process. Rather than light moving very quickly, I suggest that it was space itself that did the moving, carrying light along with it. Please note that the following street lights are not handled by The City. Report a street lighting issue The effectiveness of using full cutoff roadway lights to combat light pollution has also been called into question. According to design investigations, luminaires with full cutoff distributions (as opposed to cutoff or semi cutoff, compared here[87]) have to be closer together to meet the same light level, uniformity and glare requirements specified by the IESNA. These simulations optimized the height and spacing of the lights while constraining the overall design to meet the IESNA requirements, and then compared total uplight and energy consumption of different luminaire designs and powers. Cutoff designs performed better than full cutoff designs, and semi-cutoff performed better than either cutoff or full cutoff. This indicates that, in roadway installations, over-illumination or poor uniformity produced by full cutoff fixtures may be more detrimental than direct uplight created by fewer cutoff or semi-cutoff fixtures. Therefore, the overall performance of existing systems could be improved more by reducing the number of luminaires than by switching to full cutoff designs. Lastly, you can do your part by learning more about light pollution and by taking steps to reduce extra nighttime lighting in your own town and backyard. In addition to letting you see the stars better, these steps may also save you money on electricity and help reduce the world’s energy usage. Cities and towns that routinely put up ever-brighter lights for no reason other than “that’s what we’ve always done” may think twice about spending the money if they hear just a few voices of opposition. Street lights on red routes, however, are maintained by Transport for London (TfL) – report a problem to TfL. Central to Dorst’s frame creation model (2015 Dorst, K. (2015). Frame innovation: Create new thinking by design. Cambridge: The MIT Press. [Google Scholar]) is the great length that designers go to assess the frameworks through which problems are approached. Complex problems—such as the impacts of artificial nighttime lighting—are often caused by underlying value conflicts, and the inability of current frameworks to adequately address said values. By looking into the origins and history of the problem, the key driving issue, and the current context, a more comprehensive picture of the problem and underlying values emerge. And simultaneously the possibility of new approaches, or frames, will also emerge (Dorst, 2015 Dorst, K. (2015). Frame innovation: Create new thinking by design. Cambridge: The MIT Press. [Google Scholar]). However, for our present purposes we will not search for a new or radically different approach, but rather ask how the coalescing frame of light pollution is responding to our problem. We have our core issue present in the novel challenge described above. The next steps are to examine the origins and current context in turn, so see how light pollution can be improved as an effective frame. Clarifications to the ambiguities discussed above will likely change alongside differences in geographies, cultures, and belief systems. The recent edited volume Cities of Light (Isenstadt et al., 2014 Isenstadt, S., Maile Petty, M., & Neumann, D. (Eds.). (2014). Cities of light: Two centuries of urban illumination. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis. [Google Scholar]) provides a first overview of historic developments in nighttime illumination with respect to individual cities, a format that could be expanded to contemporary environmental debates. But regardless, if light pollution will be the frame through which regulations are established, anticipating value-level conflicts and ambiguities is important. We must clarify—or at the least debate—the normative foundations of light pollution before the framework becomes normalized and fades into the background of presuppositions informing nighttime lighting strategies. A first step is to consider the limitations for application, for which a consideration of language will be helpful. As the above discussion in Section 3 makes clear, light pollution is not simply a description of certain environmental impacts, but also an evaluation of the effects of nighttime lighting technologies and infrastructure. Light pollution is both a descriptive statement and a value judgment with normative implications—it categorizes certain uses and types of lighting as bad or wrong. Historically lighting often functioned as a form of safety and protection at night, but there has been a reversal. Now humans, animals, and the night sky require protection from artificial light. Importantly, articulating this shift in perspective via the notion of light as a pollutant adds a moral level to an otherwise technical discussion of illumination. But, in considering the creation of a moral space for deliberation, we should reflect on the implications of this label. Garrard (2004 Garrard, G. (2004). Ecocriticism. New York, NY: Routledge. [Google Scholar]), in assessing Rachel Carson’s iconic Silent Spring, notes that one of the book’s lasting achievements was expanding what was previously seen as a scientific issue (the usage of pesticides) into a social problem. By this, Garrard is referring to the categorization of pesticides as pollution. This is because ‘pollution’ does not name an actual thing, but rather provides an implicit normative claim that ‘too much of something is present in the environment, usually in the wrong place’ (2004 Garrard, G. (2004). Ecocriticism. New York, NY: Routledge. [Google Scholar], p. 6). Carson helped to reframe perspectives, allowing the usage of pesticides to be contested morally and politically. The same can be said of the concept of light pollution, generally considered: it breaks with the historical meanings and values associated with nighttime lighting, reframing discussions as a debate over how we ought to preserve and protect the night sky, as well as protect ourselves and ecosystems, from excess artificial light. vigrx eracto VigRX Plus TestX Core Celuraid Muscle Masculin Active el macho Masculin Active Maxman TestX Core

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